Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Illustrated) (English Edition)

Literarische Comics & Graphic Novels

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ( 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life.
In 1856, Dean (i.e., head of the college) Henry Liddell arrived at Christ Church, bringing with him his young family, all of whom would figure largely in Dodgson's life over the following years, and would greatly influence his writing career. Dodgson became close friends with Liddell's wife Lorina and their children, particularly the three sisters Lorina, Edith, and Alice Liddell. He was widely assumed for many years to have derived his own "Alice" from Alice Liddell; the acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking Glass spells out her name in full, and there are also many superficial references to her hidden in the text of both books. It has been noted that Dodgson himself repeatedly denied in later life that his "little heroine" was based on any real child, and he frequently dedicated his works to girls of his acquaintance, adding their names in acrostic poems at the beginning of the text. Gertrude Chataway's name appears in this form at the beginning of The Hunting of the Snark, and it is not suggested that this means that any of the characters in the narrative are based on her

Information is scarce (Dodgson's diaries for the years 1858–1862 are missing), but it seems clear that his friendship with the Liddell family was an important part of his life in the late 1850s, and he grew into the habit of taking the children on rowing trips (first the boy Harry, and later the three girls) accompanied by an adult friend to nearby Nuneham Courtenay or Godstow.

It was on one such expedition on 4 July 1862 that Dodgson invented the outline of the story that eventually became his first and greatest commercial success. He told the story to Alice Liddell and she begged him to write it down, and Dodgson eventually (after much delay) presented her with a handwritten, illustrated manuscript entitled Alice's Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.

Before this, the family of friend and mentor George MacDonald read Dodgson's incomplete manuscript, and the enthusiasm of the MacDonald children encouraged Dodgson to seek publication. In 1863, he had taken the unfinished manuscript to Macmillan the publisher, who liked it immediately. After the possible alternative titles were rejected – Alice Among the Fairies and Alice's Golden Hour – the work was finally published as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 1865 under the Lewis Carroll pen-name, which Dodgson had first used some nine years earlier. The illustrations this time were by Sir John Tenniel; Dodgson evidently thought that a published book would need the skills of a professional artist. Annotated versions provide insights into many of the ideas and hidden meanings that are prevalent in these books.

The overwhelming commercial success of the first Alice book changed Dodgson's life in many ways. The fame of his alter ego "Lewis Carroll" soon spread around the world. He was inundated with fan mail and with sometimes unwanted attention. Indeed, according to one popular story, Queen Victoria herself enjoyed Alice In Wonderland so much that she commanded that he dedicate his next book to her, and was accordingly presented with his next work, a scholarly mathematical volume entitled An Elementary Treatise on Determinants. Dodgson himself vehemently denied this story, commenting "…That Alice. When she's not traipsing after a rabbit into Wonderland, she's gallivanting off into the topsy-turvy world behind the drawing-room looking glass. In Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll's masterful and zany sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, she makes more eccentric acquaintances, including Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the White Queen, and a somewhat grumpy Humpty Dumpty. Through a giant and elaborate chess game, Alice explores this odd country, where one must eat dry biscuits to quench thirst, and run like the wind to stay in one place. As in life, Alice must stay on her toes to learn the rules of this game. Through the Looking Glass immediately took its rightful place beside its partner on the shelf of eternal classics. And luckily for generations of enraptured children, Carroll was again able to persuade John Tenniel to create the fantastic woodblock engravings that have become so indelibly associated with the Alice stories. For almost 130 years, Alice's curious adventures have amused, perplexed, and delighted readers, young and old. This gorgeous, deluxe boxed set of both volumes contains engravings from Tenniel's original woodblocks that were discovered in a London bank in 1985, and reproduced for the first time here. "'What is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures?'" What indeed? (All ages)Source of legend and lyric, reference and conjecture, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is, for most children, pure pleasure in prose. While adults try to decipher Lewis Carroll's putative use of complex mathematical codes in the text, or debate his alleged use of opium, young readers simply dive with Alice through the rabbit hole, pursuing "The dream-child moving through a land / Of wonders wild and new". There they encounter the White Rabbit, the Queen of Hearts, the Mock Turtle and the Mad Hatter, together with a multitude of other characters–extinct, fantastical and commonplace creatures. Alice journeys through this Wonderland, trying to fathom the meaning of her strange experiences. But they turn out to be "curiouser and curiouser", seemingly without moral or sense.

For more than 130 years, children have revelled in the delightfully non-moralistic, non-educational virtues of this classic. In fact, at every turn Alice's new companions scoff at her traditional education. The Mock Turtle, for example, remarks that he took the "regular course" in school: Reeling, Writhing and branches of Arithmetic–Ambition, Distraction, Uglification and Derision. Carroll believed John Tenniel's illustrations were as important as his text. Naturally, Carroll's instincts were good; the masterful drawings, reproduced here, are inextricably tied to the well-loved story. (All ages)That Alice. When she's not traipsing after a rabbit into Wonderland, she's gallivanting off into the topsy-turvy world behind the drawing-room looking glass. In Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll's masterful and zany sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, she makes more eccentric acquaintances, including Tweedledee and Tweedledum, the White Queen, and a somewhat grumpy Humpty Dumpty. Through a giant and elaborate chess game, Alice explores this odd country, where one must eat dry biscuits to quench thirst, and run like the wind to stay in one place. As in life, Alice must stay on her toes to learn the rules of this game. Through the Looking Glass immediately took its rightful place beside its partner on the shelf of eternal classics. And luckily for generations of enraptured children, Carroll was again able to persuade John Tenniel to create the fantastic woodblock engravings that have become so indelibly associated with the Alice stories. For almost 130 years, Alice's curious adventures have amused, perplexed, and delighted readers, young and old. This gorgeous, deluxe boxed set of both volumes contains engravings from Tenniel's original woodblocks that were discovered in a London bank in 1985, and reproduced for the first time here. "'What is the use of a book,' thought Alice, 'without pictures?'" What indeed? (All ages) Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ( 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life.
In 1856, Dean (i.e., head of the college) Henry Liddell arrived at Christ Church, bringing with him his young family, all of whom would figure largely in Dodgson's life over the following years, and would greatly influence his writing career. Dodgson became close friends with Liddell's wife Lorina and their children, particularly the three sisters Lorina, Edith, and Alice Liddell. He was widely assumed for many years to have derived his own "Alice" from Alice Liddell; the acrostic poem at the end of Through the Looking Glass spells out her name in full, and there are also many superficial references to her hidden in the text of both books. It has been noted that Dodgson himself repeatedly denied in later life that his "little heroine" was based on any real child, and he frequently dedicated his works to girls of his acquaintance, adding their names in acrostic poems at the beginning of the text. Gertrude Chataway's name appears in this form at the beginning of The Hunting of the Snark, and it is not suggested that this means that any of the characters in the narrative are based on her

Information is scarce (Dodgson's diaries for the years 1858–1862 are missing), but it seems clear that his friendship with the Liddell family was an important part of his life in the late 1850s, and he grew into the habit of taking the children on rowing trips (first the boy Harry, and later the three girls) accompanied by an adult friend to nearby Nuneham Courtenay or Godstow.

It was on one such expedition on 4 July 1862 that Dodgson invented the outline of the story that eventually became his first and greatest commercial success. He told the story to Alice Liddell and she begged him to write it down, and Dodgson eventually (after much delay) presented her with a handwritten, illustrated manuscript entitled Alice's Adventures Under Ground in November 1864.

Before this, the family of friend and mentor George MacDonald read Dodgson's incomplete manuscript, and the enthusiasm of the MacDonald children encouraged Dodgson to seek publication. In 1863, he had taken the unfinished manuscript to Macmillan the publisher, who liked it immediately. After the possible alternative titles were rejected – Alice Among the Fairies and Alice's Golden Hour – the work was finally published as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in 1865 under the Lewis Carroll pen-name, which Dodgson had first used some nine years earlier. The illustrations this time were by Sir John Tenniel; Dodgson evidently thought that a published book would need the skills of a professional artist. Annotated versions provide insights into many of the ideas and hidden meanings that are prevalent in these books.

The overwhelming commercial success of the first Alice book changed Dodgson's life in many ways. The fame of his alter ego "Lewis Carroll" soon spread around the world. He was inundated with fan mail and with sometimes unwanted attention. Indeed, according to one popular story, Queen Victoria herself enjoyed Alice In Wonderland so much that she commanded that he dedicate his next book to her, and was accordingly presented with his next work, a scholarly mathematical volume entitled An Elementary Treatise on Determinants. Dodgson himself vehemently denied this story, commenting "…


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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Illustrated) (English Edition)

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3 Replies to “Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Illustrated) (English Edition)”

  1. 47 von 49 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
    5.0 von 5 Sternen
    So muss ein Buch aussehen – Alice im schoensten Format, 8. März 2006
    Von 
    Dichtung&Kritik (Mannheim) – Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen

    Rezension bezieht sich auf: Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition (Gebundene Ausgabe)
    Das hier ist die schoenste Ausgabe der Alice-Erzaehlungen von Lewis Carroll. Es ist der englische Originaltext beider Erzaehlungen (Alice im Wunderland und Alice hinter den Spiegeln), dazu die Originalzeichnungen von Tenniell. Ausserdem ist das Buch grossformatig mit schoenem starken Einband und einer ebenso herrlichen Huelle. Die Seiten sind fest und leicht glaenzend. Der Text ist so gedruckt, dass die Haelfte der Seite vom Text eingenommen wird und die andere Haelfte der Seite fuer Annotations freigegeben ist, die den Text ergaengzen und teilweise ebenso spannend und interessant sind wie der Text selbst. Gerade fuer uns moderne Menschen, die wir uns Carrolls Zeitalter (dem viktorianischen) vielleicht nicht mehr so vertraut fuehlen, sind diese Anmerkungen (Annotations) Gold wert. Erst jetzt versteht man manche Anspielung oder Subtilitaet. Ich empfand die Anmerkungen als Tuer in eine viel weitere Betrachtungsweise.
    Der schoene Druck, die herrliche Aufmachung, die wunderbare Alice-Geschichte, die Anmerkungen – das alles ist hier vollendet zu einem ansehlichen Buch zusammengearbeitet. Lesenswert.
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  2. 4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
    4.0 von 5 Sternen
    Die Uralice, 10. Mai 2012
    Von 
    callisto (Freiburg) – Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen
    (TOP 500 REZENSENT)
      

    Rezension bezieht sich auf: Alice's Adventures Under Ground: A Fascimile: A Facsimile (Gebundene Ausgabe)
    Am 4. July 1862 unternahmen Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) und sein Freund Robinson Duckworth mit den drei Töchtern von Henry Liddell (dem Vizekanzler der Universität von Oxford) eine Paddaltour auf dem Flüsschen Isis. Die drei Mädchen an Bord waren Lorina Charlotte Liddell ("Prima" im einleitenden Gedicht), Alice Pleasance Liddell ("Secunda" im einleitenden Gedicht) und Edith Mary Liddell ("Tertia" im einleitenden Gedicht). Auf dieser Bootstour erzählte Lewis Carroll die Geschichte von Alice im Wunderland ad hoc zum Amüsement der Mädchen. Alice bat ihn daraufhin, die Geschichte für sie aufzuschreiben, was Lewis Carroll dann auch tat. Am 26.11.1864 schenkte er Alice Pleasance Liddell ein handgeschriebenes, teils bunt illustriertes Manuskript mit dem Titel "Alice's Adventures Under Ground", das viele Jahre später als Faksimile nachgedruckt wurde, nachdem die für die breite Öffentlichkeit überarbeitete Ausgabe ein weltweiter Erfolg geworden war.

    "Alice's Adventures Under Ground" ist die Uralice, die Carroll für Alice Lidell aufschrieb. Der Autor bat seine echte Alice, ob es für sie OK wäre, wenn er das Buch, das er ihr als Kind schenkte als Faksimile herausbringt, weil viele andere gerne wüssten, wie diese Uralicegeschichte war. Es gibt einige Unterschiede zu der bekannten Version, die später veröffentlicht wurde.
    * Der Hase verliert keinen Fächer sondern ein Biedermeiersträußchen.
    * Statt eines caucus race geht man einfach in ein nahegelegenes Häuschen, um sich zu trocknen.
    * "the top will make you grow taller, and the stalk will make you grow shorter." (Logischer als in der letztendlich veröffentlichten Version mit eine Seite und andere Seite.)
    * Keine verrückte Teeparty, dafür ein Baum mit Tür, der wieder in die Halle vom Anfang führt und diesmal geht Alice durch die Tür mit den Blumen und kommt im Garten der Herzkönigin heraus.
    * "Queen of Hearts," said the rabbit in a whisper, putting its mouth close to her ear, "and Marchioness of Mock Turtles." (Der zweite Ehrentitel fällt später weg.)
    * Man spielt mit einem Straus statt Flamingo Krocket

    Die Handschrift ist sehr gut zu lesen, Carroll schrieb schließlich für ein Kind, das diese Geschichte selber lesen können sollte. Erstaunlicherweise sind Carolls selbstgemalte Bilder richtig gut.
    Einige Jahre später, als Alice Liddell nach dem Tode ihres Ehemannes Reginald Hargreaves in finanzielle Nöte geriet, musste sie die Original Handschrift bei Sotheby's versteigern lassen. Das Buch ging damals für 15,400 GBP über den Tisch und löste alle finanziellen Probleme von Alice. Eine hochauflösende farbige Präsentation des Buches kann auf der Homepage der British Library betrachtet werden. Das Original, das Carroll seiner Alice schenkte ist heute ein Nationalschatz.

    Insgesamt gefällt mir diese Version sogar besser, als jene, die letztendlich veröffentlicht wurde und zu einem Welterfolg wurde. Sie ist direkter, ursprünglicher, ehrlicher und weniger gekünstelt, allgemein einfach kindgerechter.

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  3. 3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
    5.0 von 5 Sternen
    This Collector's Library series is good, 9. März 2010
    Von 
    Kohlrabi – Alle meine Rezensionen ansehen

    Rezension bezieht sich auf: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Collector's Library) (Gebundene Ausgabe)
    The new film (with Johnny Depp) got me interested in Alice in Wonderland again and I wanted a nice copy of the book. I have a couple of hardbacks from the "Everyman's Library" series and was not familiar with the "Collector's Library". Well, the Alice book from Everyman's Library wasn't immediately available online so I decided to wait and check out the other series.

    The Collector's Library books are small! To give you a rough idea of the size: fold a sheet of A4 twice down the middle; as in, the book is about 1/4 of A4. I was sort of taken back by this but in terms of quality, it seems to be just as nice as the Everyman's Library books. It has gilt edges and a ribbon marker. If you like to have a book in your bag, then this is it. It's really compact. It's of course hardback, and cloth-bound with gilt edges. And because it's so light, you won't get arm aches from holding it at odd positions, if you're lying down etc. This is something you can't do with most of the Everyman's Library books, as they're too big, too heavy.

    This book, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, has black and white pictures in it. (FYI: The Secret Garden (Collector's library), another children's book, does not. Hmm, I wonder why?)

    Ok, the pages do seem to be thinner than the Everyman's Library books – you can see some of the print on the other side of the paper – but it's not that bad. I haven't tried reading it yet so I can't really say but I looked through it in the bookshop and bought it. Doesn't that say something?

    I like it and think it's so nice that I am now tempted to carry it around with me.

    Update: I've read it. And the pages being slightly thin – that didn't bother me at all. It's easy to keep the pages open with one hand because the whole thing is so small and light. You don't have to worry about creasing the front cover (which makes me want to disown any book) because it's hardback. I did take off the paper cover whilst reading it because it got in the way. I'll be getting more in this series.

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